Sep 5

Electronic Stability Control | DCS History Pt 3/5

To quickly recap from parts 1 and 2, during the early 1990s, ABS brakes where the most advanced braking technology for cars.

Be sure to check out ESC Part 1 if you’ve just joined us today!

bmw late ABS brakesInitial models of the electronic stability control began appearing in 1995, in the form of the dynamic stability control. The DCS was installed to the BMW 7500iL, which was among the top luxury cars of that time. Later the system was also installed to the BMW 850Ci, which was popular for its V12, 5.4-liter engine that gave the vehicle unprecedented power.

Bosch then built the Dynamic Stability Control system that was similar to the DSC but a little more advanced. The DSC was capable of taking each wheels’ speeds and pressures at 50 times per second and was designed to remain active whether the driver applied the brakes or not. The DCS also took readings from the suspension and steering and could detect major changes or stresses on different parts of the vehicle to determine if the amount of forces were dangerous towards losing control before taking automated countered measures.

The DSC was capable of taking each wheels’ speeds and pressures at 50 times per second and was designed to remain active whether the driver applied the brakes or not.

ABS Brakes corneringThe dynamic system control was more similar to the principles used on the ABS brakes but were more advanced since the sensors installed on the vehicle’s wheels also helped to avert over steer while applying brakes when attacking bends at high speed. If the driver hit the brakes hard enough, the DSC system would engage after the sensors signaled the pivot point. This helped manage each wheel and its braking capacity and also made sure the vehicle remained stable without locking up the wheels. The DSC system was mainly built around the braking system and used the brakes to keep the vehicle stabilize.

A year later, Mercedes unveiled the even more sophisticated electronic stability program (ESP); it was installed to the S600 that also had a V12 engine and outrageous amounts of power. The system was closer to what we today know as the electronic stability control system. It was linked to a simple computer, which controlled and managed traction and stability of the vehicle while braking or taking on bends at high speed. The stability control program had automatic torque reduction if the vehicle is taking a turn too fast and began losing stability. The difference between the two was the Mercedes ESP was individually linked to each wheel, which had an independent suspension to improve traction and stability.

Stay Tuned for the final installment Part 4!